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TAVOR History

At the end of the 1982 Israel-Lebanon War arose an understanding that the modern battlefield is changing. One of the conclusions from the war, relevant to the small arms industry, was that the battle has moved from the open space into a CQB (Close Quarter Battle) and that there is a need for battle transition from day to night on a single mission.

In 1993 the Israel Military Industry (IMI) began the process of developing the next standard issue weapon for the Israel Defense Force (IDF) soldiers. In the midst of 1994 the IMI Tavor development team was launched underway, headed by Mr. Zalman Shebs, the father of the Tavor, Doron Erez the chief engineer, Amnon Shiloni and Erez Boyarski. In order to answer the challenge, of  fighting both in open terrain, engageing targets at a large distance and  at the same time also fighting in CQB, the team chose the bullpup configuration for the new modern assault rifle.

In 1995 the IDF joined the development team and the project mission was published.

In 1997 the first hands on trial  began in many IDF units with the purpose of testing the ergonomics of the rifle.

In 2000 the Tavor entered the IDF Non-Commission Officers (NCO) infantry school for extensive field tests. These are some of the hardcore tests that no laboratory test  can compare to: long weeks in extreme conditions, rugged terrain such as  boulders and desert, dropping,  human factors etc.

After two years of rugged testing, the Tavor was ready for the next stage. In 2002 an army company in the Givati brigade was given the Tavor for more experiments and testing.

In September 2003 the IDF decided to procure Tavor rifles for the infantry corps.

The first rifles arrived at the Infantry brigades during  2006.  Today all the IDF infantry units use the Tavor family as their primary assault rifle.

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